Sensorimotor Approach/ Rood Approach

Sensorimotor Approach/ Rood Approach

  • Proprioception
    • Facilitory
      • Quick Stretchà muscle contraction
      • Resistanceà muscle contraction
      • Joint approximationà joint awareness; co-contraction responses
      • Joint Tractionà joint motion; joint awareness
    • Inhibitory
      • Prolonged Stretchà muscle contraction
      • Inhibitory Pressureà muscle tone
    • Exteroceptive
      • Facilitory
        • Manual Contactà sensory awareness; muscle contraction
        • Light Touchà protection and alerting responses; discriminative responses
        • Maintained Touchà tactile receptors
      • Inhibitory
        • Slow Strokingà generalized tone; reduction of pain
        • Neutral Warmthà generalized tone
        • Prolonged icingà neural and muscle spindle firing; muscle tone; muscle spasms
      • Vestibular
        • Facilitory
          • Vestibular Stimulationà (could be facilitory or inhibitory depending on the person; could facilitate an emotional responses due to the limbic system) active movements; postural/ tonal adjustments
        • Inhibitory
          • Slow vestibular stimulationà generalized relaxation; muscle tone; arousal; sympathetic responses
        • Vision
          • Facilitoryà visual discrimination; conscious awareness; recognition of objects; visual tracking; alerting/ orienting responses; visual proprioception; active movements; postural tone adjustments (could be facilitory or inhibitory depending on the person; could facilitate an emotional responses due to the limbic system)
        • Auditory
          • Facilitoryà auditory discrimination; conscious awareness; recognition of sounds; auditory tracking responses; active movement responses; alerting/ orienting responses (could be facilitory or inhibitory depending on the person; could facilitate an emotional responses due to the limbic system)
        • Olfactory
          • Pleasant, familiar scentsà relaxation; pleasure; positive mood; reduction of tone and hyperkinetic movements (could be facilitory or inhibitory depending on the person; could facilitate an emotional responses due to the limbic system)
          • Noxious scentsà alertness/ orienting responses; active movement responses; active movement responses; postural/ tonal adjustments
        • Gustatory
          • Facilitoryà recognition of tastes; fast adapting
          • Various foods provoke emotional, sensory, and motor responses
  • SI Training
    • Improves sensory discrimination, ability to identify specific stimuli, and improve perception (selection, attention, and response to sensory inputs) with appropriate use of information to generate specific motor responses

 

 

Resources for full article “A Detailed Outline of Neurorehabilitation Technique for Post-Stroke Symptoms”:

Corbett, A. (2012). Stroke. Brain Foundation: Headache Australia. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://brainfoundation.org.au/a-z-of-disorders/107-stroke#effectsofstroke

Cuccurullo S, editor. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Board Review. New York: Demos Medical Publishing; 2004. Stroke Rehabilitation. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK27209/

Dickstein, R., Hocherman, S., & Shaham, R. (1986). Stroke Rehabilitation: Three Exercise Therapy Approaches. Physical Therapy Journal, 66 (8).

Ernst, E. (1990). A review of stroke rehabilitation and physiotherapy. Stoke. Retrieved on December 10, 2012 from http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/21/7/1081

IPNFA. (2012). What is IPNFA? Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation from facilitation to participation. Retrieved on November 25, 2012 from http://www.ipnfa.org/index.php?id=115

Kollen, B., Lennon, S., Lyons, B., Wheatley-Smith, L., Scheper, M., Buurke, J., Halfens, J., Geurts, A., & Kwakkel, G. (2009). Stroke Rehabilitation What is the Evidence? American Heart Association Journals. Retrieved on November 25, 2012 from http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/40/4/e89

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2012). Stroke. Diseases and Conditions. Retrieved on November 25, 2012 from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/stroke/DS00150

O’Sullivan, S. & Schmitz, T. (2007). Strategies to Improve Motor Function. Physical Rehabilitation 5th ed. Retrieved on November 25, 2012 from http://www.google.com/url?url=http://docs.thinkfree.com/tools/download.php%3Fmode%3Ddown%26dsn%3D861433&rct=j&sa=U&ei=1JLGUOuvBNTOqQHI9oGwDg&ved=0CBUQFjAA&sig2=4094qnrZ_b4KrzUbJGHsIw&q=physical+rehabilitation+5th+ed+osullivan+and+shmitz+Strategies+to+Improve+Motor+Function+chapter+13&usg=AFQjCNGi1S0r5Dc1uP6pMAu7uWtmIaAWxA

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